American Studies home

AMS Profiles

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American Studies at Miami University

Faculty & Staff

Core Faculty

Andrew M. Busch

Andrew M. Busch photoAndrew M. Busch (Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, 2011) joined Miami University in the fall of 2012 as a Visiting Assistant Professor of American Studies. He teaches classes on cities, the environment, and globalization. His work focuses on the intersections among urban development, race, environmentalism, and political economy. His current project, City in a Garden: Race, Progressivism, and the Environment in Making Modern Austin, Texas investigates the development of Austin, Texas and the ways that ideologies of the natural and the urban shaped the race and class geography of the city. The manuscript is under contract with the University of North Carolina Press. In 2010 he was nominated for the William S. Livingston Outstanding Graduate Student Academic Employee Award at UT, and he has published recent essays in the Journal of Urban History, American Quarterly, and Republic of Barbecue. He also helped develop a public and oral history archive on Texas barbecue with the Southern Foodways Alliance at the University of Mississippi. His future projects include a study of the relationship between urban renewal and gentrification and a book on environmental inequities in the American South. Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

Sheila Croucher

Sheila Croucher photoSheila Croucher (Ph.D. University of Florida, 1993) is a Distinguished Professor of American Studies. Trained in comparative politics, her research and teaching interests include: cultural and political belonging, globalization, privileged migration, transnationalism, ethnic politics, and gender. She is the author of The Other Side of the Fence: American Migrants in Mexico (2009), Globalization and Belonging: The Politics of Identity in a Changing World (2003), and Imagining Miami: Ethnic Politics in a Postmodern World (1997) as well as dozens of articles. Her most recent work focuses on privileged mobility in the Americas, and specifically the migration of native-born U.S. citizens to Mexico and Canada. More generally, Professor Croucher's scholarship and teaching explore the implications of globalization for the form and the content of American nationhood, the changing nature of citizenship, and the tug and pull of cosmopolitan imperatives and patriotic attachments. She has presented her work at over 30 national and international conferences and been invited to deliver keynote addresses at several institutions, including the London School of Economics' Association for the Study of Ethnicity and Nationalism, the European Network of American Alumni Associations, and the Centre of Human and Social Sciences, Spanish National Research Council. Dr. Croucher's awards include the Miami University Distinguished Scholar Award (2011), the Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in North American Studies at Carleton University (2009), the College of Arts and Science Distinguished Educator Award (2009), Research Fellowship with the Center for Inter-American Studies and Programs at the Instituto Tecnologico Autonomo in Mexico City (2007), and the Miami University Associated Student Government Outstanding Teacher Award (1998). Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

H. Louise Davis

Louise Davis photoLouise Davis (Ph.D. Michigan State University, 2008) joined Miami in fall 2010 as an Assistant Professor of American Studies and the Director of the Bachelor of Integrated Studies Program on the regional campuses. Her work focuses on ethical consumerism, social movements, transatlantic media and cultural studies, gender and youth studies. She has published articles on representations of the African Madonna and Child icon and celebrity activitsm. She is currently working on a book length exploration of an emerging transatlantic "culture of charity" that emerged out of Third World Aid campaigns of the mid-1980s. Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

Sandra Garner

Sandra Garner photoSandra Garner (Ph.D. The Ohio State University, 2010) joined Miami University in the fall of 2010 as a Heanon Wilkins Fellow. She specializes in American Indian and Indigenous studies in the Americas with an emphasis on the construction, circulation and material effects of representations of Native people. She is the 2011-2012 Heanon Wilkins Fellow in AMS. Her current work focuses on competing historical and contemporary narratives about the Newark Earthworks (Ohio), the largest geometric mound complex in the world. Her previous work about the site has included an oral history project on American Indians in Ohio, planning and implementing four educational, public symposiums about the earthworks, and a seventy mile pilgrimage walk from the mounds in Chillicothe to Newark. She is a content expert for a newly funded NEH project called Ancient Ohio Trails. Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

Adrian Gaskins

Adrian Gaskins photoAdrian Gaskins (Ph.D. University of Minnesota, 2010) joined Miami University in the fall of 2008 as a Heanon Wilkins Fellow. He is currently a lecturer in Black World Studies and American Studies. His research interests are American and African American studies, 20th century American history, critical race theory, with specialties in empire, comparative diasporas, labor, and blacks in the military. Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy

Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy photoOana Godeanu-Kenworthy (Ph.D. University of Bucharest, Romania, 2006) joined Miami in 2008 as a lecturer in American Studies. Her teaching and research interests focus on transnationalism, globalization, popular culture, and the comparative study of new literatures in English. She is the recipient of the 2007 ICCS-CIEC Award for Best Doctoral dissertation in Canadian Studies. Godeanu-Kenworthy was a 2011-12 Kluge Postdoctoral Fellow at the Library of Congress in Washington DC, a 2006 postdoctoral fellow at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University in Frankfurt, Germany, and a graduate fellow at the JFK Institute for North American Studies in Berlin, Germany (2003), the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary (2004), and the Institute for Canadian Studies, Ottawa, Canada (2005). Her articles on American and Canadian literature and on European film were published in Early American Literature, Early American Studies, and the Journal of European Studies. Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

Kimberly Hamlin

Kimberly Hamlin photoKimberly Hamlin (Ph.D. University of Texas, 2007) is an Associate Professor of American Studies and History and the Director of the American Studies Program. Her work focuses on the intersections of science, religion, and gender. Her book From Eve to Evolution: Darwin, Science, and Women's Rights in Gilded Age America (University of Chicago Press, 2014), documents women's responses to evolutionary theory and analyzes the American reception of Darwin through the lens of gender. This project grew out of her dissertation, which was a finalist for the American Studies Association's Ralph Henry Gabriel Dissertation Prize and the Organization of American Historians' Lerner-Scott Prize for the best dissertation in U.S. women's history. Her article, "'The Case of a Bearded Woman': Hypertrichosis and the Construction of Gender in the Age of Darwin," American Quarterly 63 (December 2011) earned her the 2012 Emerging Scholar Award from the Nineteenth Century Studies Association. She is currently working on a biography of the freethinking feminist Helen Hamilton Gardener (1853-1925), a woman who played a vital role in the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment and later donated her brain to science to prove women’s intellectual equality. Her future projects include an analysis of scientific and popular ideas about sex determination, 1870-1970. Hamlin has also worked on the history of the Girl Scouts and served as historical consultant on the PBS documentary "Troop 1500." Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

Brian Michael Murphy

Brian Murphy photoBrian Michael Murphy (Ph.D. The Ohio State University, 2014) is a Visiting Assistant Professor of American Studies. His research and teaching interests include: media preservation, visual culture, race, media archaeology, digital technology, and hip hop studies. His current book project traces the emergence and intensification of Americans' obsession with preserving media—moving images, photography, sound recordings, microfilm, and now digital files. He published an article on Bill Gates' underground, securitized Corbis Film Preservation Facility in Media-N, and his poems have appeared in SLAB, Birmingham Poetry Review, and CHEST, among other places. In 2014, he received the Margaret Lynd Graduate Associate Teaching Award (Ohio State) for his hip hop studies course on the cultural impact of Nas's debut album Illmatic. He has served as the Interim Assistant Director of Multicultural Affairs at Capital University, and the College Readiness Coordinator at The Charles School at Ohio Dominican University. In the summers, he teaches creative writing in the Kenyon Review Young Writers Workshop at Kenyon College. Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

Damon Scott

Damon Scott photoDamon Scott (Ph.D University of Texas, Austin, 2008) is a lecturer in American Studies and Geography. His work focuses on the imprint of culture on urban landscapes and the ways different places can reinforce specific notions of self and community. His work is informed by current trends in cultural studies and geography that look critically at the concepts of culture, place and space in U.S. cities. His current project, The City Aroused, examines the intersections of urban redevelopment and sexual politics in San Francisco in the 1950s and 1960s. As a consultant to a local architectural preservation group, he drafted an historical narrative and a public policy rationale for creating a GLBT historic district in San Francisco. He has taught several upper-division AMS courses in which students research and produce short documentaries external link iconon the impact of urban renewal on an Ohio city. Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

Marguerite S. Shaffer

Marguerite S. Shaffer photoMarguerite S. Shaffer (Ph.D. Harvard University, 1994) is an Associate Professor of American Studies and History. Her work focuses on U.S. cultural history with an emphasis on conceptions of nature and the construction of public culture. She is the author of See America First: Tourism and National Identity, 1880-1940 (2001) and the editor of Public Culture: Diversity, Democracy, and Community in the United States (2008) and Rendering Nature: Animals, Bodies, Places, Politics (with Phoebe S. K. Young 2015). She has published a number of articles on tourism, national parks, scenery, and regional identity of the American West. She also has worked as a research associate for the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History and served as a consultant for the Autry Museum of Western History. Her current research focuses on the expressions and activities of popular environmentalism. In 2011, Dr. Shaffer received the Mid-America American Studies Association Elizabeth Kolmer Award for teaching and mentoring in American Studies. In 2010, she received the College of Arts and Science Distinguished Educator Award. She is currently a Humanities Center Altman Fellow facilitating a year-long program entitled "The Anthropocene: A New Era in Human-Environment Relations" (with Tom Crist).
Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

Helen Sheumaker

Helen Sheumaker photoHelen Sheumaker (Ph.D. University of Kansas, 1999) is is a lecturer in American Studies and History. Her work focuses on issues of consumerism in nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century United States. She is the author of Love Entwined: The Story of Human Hair Work in American Society, University of Pennsylvania Press (2007). She also co-edited Material Culture: An Encyclopedia with Shirley Teresa Wadja for ABC-CLIO press. She teaches courses in American Studies, Public History and Museums, Popular Culture, and American History. Her current research project is a cultural history of secondhand shopping in the U.S. Contact info and brief CV [PDF]

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Affiliate Faculty

Ann Elizabeth Armstrong
associate professor
Department of Theatre
armstra2@MiamiOH.edu
Ron Becker
assistant professor
Department of Communication
beckerrp@MiamiOH.edu
Robert Benson
professor
Department of Architecture and Interior Design
bensonra@MiamiOH.edu
Ann Michelle Jarrett Bromberg
associate professor
Department of Spanish and Portuguese (Hamilton Campus)
jarretam@MiamiOH.edu
Andrew Cayton
distinguished professor
Department of History
caytonar@MiamiOH.edu
Mary Frederickson
associate professor
Department of History
frederme@MiamiOH.edu
Carolyn A. Haynes
professor & director
Honors & Scholars Program
haynesca@MiamiOH.edu
Tammy Kernodle
associate professor
Department of Music
kernodtl@MiamiOH.edu
Theresa A. Kulbaga
assistant professor
Department of English (Hamilton Campus)
kulbagta@MiamiOH.edu
Timothy Melley
associate professor
Department of English
mellleytd@MiamiOH.edu
Kate Rousmaniere
professor, chair
Department of Educational Leadership
rousmak@MiamiOH.edu
Susan Kay Sloan
professor
Department of English
sloansk@MiamiOH.edu
James E. Tobin
associate professor
Journalism Program
tobinje@MiamiOH.edu
Allan M. Winkler
distinguished professor
Department of History
winkleam@MiamiOH.edu

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Staff

Rene McKinstry
program associate
Programs Office
120 MacMillan
mckinsdr@MiamiOH.edu
(513) 529-5333
Cathie F. Sherman,
program associate
Programs Office
120 MacMillan
shermacf@MiamiOH.edu
(513) 529-5333

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